Archives for posts with tag: autistic people understanding

I’m so sorry they “had” to die… But they gave themselves to a very honorable cause: MY SON cooked dinner with me last night!!! (Oh, and it wasn’t a grilled cheese sandwich or a pizza!)

I am so proud of him… 

Those of you who’ve followed this blog for a while may remember that he has an autism diagnosis… And since he’s turned 15, he’s been on a remarkable tear of learning life skills.

At his own initiative.

Last night, he and I cooked pasta, enhanced a marinara, chopped Belgian endive (…um, no, not for the pasta…), and sauteed shrimp.

He learned what paprika tastes like, and what al dente feels like. Oh, and to wait until the water boils to put the salt in.

But guess what the totally unexpected BONUS was?

When we got home from shopping, I was exhausted from a long, busy day. I was dreading heating up the bottled sauce and waiting on the spaghetti to be done… I just wanted to go lie down.

But when I realized, after a few minutes, that he was actually going to stay there in the kitchen with me and do whatever I asked to help, I became energized! We had fun, the food was excellent, and I felt so good when we were done that I even happily washed up.

We really never know where the next quiet, unassuming gift of love is going to come from, do we?

May we all enjoy such gifts, just when we need them!

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Let’s begin at the end of questioning.

All people have a place of peace and learning.

A quiet peace is acceptable to others. Disruptive peace calls for diagnosis.

When someone receives a diagnosis of Autism, Asperger’s, or ADHD, the world changes for them and others.

Diagnoses may lead to labeling; labeling may lead to stereotyping; stereotyping may lead to dismissiveness.

Everyone in this world is unique. Everyone in the world deserves to be recognized as a unique individual.

Developing and receiving diagnoses changes the world. For adults, receiving a diagnosis can be like finding a missing puzzle piece.

It may also bring relief and understanding. It may project confusion and fear. It may arouse resistance to being “labeled”.

We don’t always notice when we perceive things differently from those around us.

How does one learn he’s colorblind?

Or deaf?

Don’t worry about diagnosis. Understand yourself.

Working with others requires compromise. Compromise implies mutual effort.

Into this changing world, many people will continue to emerge who are not “normal”. Some day there will be no “normal” that will develop from formulated expectations.

Someday, “normal” will mean different and unique.

That will be a beautiful day.

We work with others in ways we cannot always perceive immediately.

We interact with others in our own ways.

What a beautiful day.

(this post is part one of a script for an upcoming video on autism, asperger’s syndrome and adhd. the preliminary version of the video may be viewed here.)