Archives for posts with tag: ADHD autism aspergers diagnosis

http://youtu.be/p2FugTurW7Q

“RIDING THE SPECTRUM: HIGH GEAR AND LOW GEAR”

a Video presentation for the ADHD Coaches Organization Conference, Atlanta GA 2012

[This video is a remix of the original version (http://youtu.be/JYTwSWzG3wE); the original gives a more accurate rendering of the spectrum experience… My friends on the spectrum “got it” immediately… My “neuro-typical” friends said it was too fast and mixed up… So there you have it… Vive la difference! ;)]

A peek inside the experience of very special minds, that receive and filter sensory information in ways that defy “neuro-typical”.

In 2000, Leslee Hare began a journey with many twists and turns. She was working with specialists who eventually diagnosed her son Lucas with Autism. During the process she realized that if Lucas was “Autistic”, then she was certainly “Something” not very far removed along the Spectrum.

Lucas simply rode in high gear, while she coasted along in low gear, under the radar and managing to fit in… somewhat.

Through over a decade of working with Lucas, Leslee became convinced that the “Spectrum” encompasses more than just Autism, Asperger’s, PDD-NOS, Sensory Integration Issues, Proprioceptive Issues, etc.

She perceives that ADHD, Asperger’s and Autism – and many other labels that we use to describe neurological differences, including some “paranormal” phenomena – simply describe different points on the Spectrum.

And the folks who think they’re “neuro-typical” slide along the Spectrum, too. They just happen to have been in the majority… until now.

We all share this ride.

Part One:
High Gear reveals the world that appears to someone with very high-functioning ADHD, Asperger’s Syndrome, or Autism.

Part Two:
Low Gear filters the world into the more regulated experience of a person who’s managed to qualify as “normal”.

The two versions of Riding The Spectrum loop in sequence.

Experience them both, and glimpse a wider view of the world as it flies by.

(Words, images, direction & production by Leslee Hare; Music by Matthew Pelosi)

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

Leslee Hare

Keep the words concise and the images overflowing with content. You see everything you’re meant to see, in the many layers of intention and desire.
My tendency to use strong words to express my understanding of life taught me that editing brings deeper understanding. I rant and then sift through the chaff, lifting out the essential grains of my truth. I love getting help and comments from friends. Each word struck and added indicates progress.
I begin with a concept, next comes a script, then the images arise from the energy behind the words. I use only original work… my own artwork and fonts, my amateurish photography, half a dozen software programs, and some amazing original music by Matt Pelosi. With this trance-like process, intuition nudges these videos into being.
I hope they help you find another bit of your own inner spark!
9 January 2012

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Selecting Musical Instruments for Children – Guest Post by Dr. Vicki Panaccione.

I hope my fellow Mom-Blogger Laura Lamere doesn’t mind my re-posting this wonderful article… It’s Saturday morning and my eyes are still half-closed! Thank you, Laura and Dr. Panaccione!

Selecting Musical Instruments for Children – Guest Post by Dr. Vicki Panaccione

 

– Originally published: January 26, 2011 – Reposted with permission by Dr. Vicki Panaccione   –

Selecting musical instruments for children seems like the responsibility of parents.  Piano seems to be the starter instrument of choice for many parents who have pianos in their home.  But what if your children don’t want to play the piano?  Or, what if they like to plink upon the keys but have no interest in doing more than that?  What’s a parent to do?

Playing an instrument has many benefits, including helping children learn patience, develop coordination, stimulate their creative juices, and so on.  Some children have obvious talent, while others not so much.  But, I feel that if the selection of musical instruments for children is left to their own choosing, their natural guidance systems will lead them to the instrument(s) that ‘sing’ to them.

Selecting Musical Instruments for Children with Different Learning Styles

(please click to read more)

 


My son talks with me a lot.

The conversations are often challenging, but words cannot convey the depth of love, pride, and amazement I feel when he asks questions that I doubt many 15-year-olds ask anyone.

And society teaches us that Autism is a disability. Makes you wonder.

Now, he may wish I were dead before this is all over, but I’ve decided to start writing about our conversations.

Some of the topics don’t belong on a blog that’s not rated “mature”, so I’m afraid you won’t hear about those (except in thickly veiled terms). But many of them seem quite universal. And having these conversations with a young adult who looks from a very a-typical point of view sheds a sometimes poignant perspective on the topics.

“Mom, am I a bad person?”

My heart wrenches, just remembering those words.

This question arose in the car on the way to school one morning, the day after he had told me about three incidents at school.

Incident 1:

“I kinda got in trouble today because I threw fluffy seeds on a kid when we were outside.”

Oh, he didn’t like it, huh?

“No, I guess not.”

Well, it might help to remember that, just like you can’t stand it when other people sing, other kids at school have their things that they can’t stand. So maybe this kid doesn’t like fluffy things.

“Yeah, maybe.”

So, why did you do it, anyway? Did you mean to upset him, or were you teasing him? Or you just wanted to see what he’d do?

“Well, I was doing this story in my head where this other guy and I were doing a joke to throw fluffy seeds on him, and see if it made him turn fluffy… And that kid just happened to be there.”

Oh, so you were doing a story, and it wasn’t even about the kid you threw the seeds at?

“Right.”

Oh, okay. Well, just try to remember that you don’t like people singing around you, so it’s nice to be considerate of others when you do things to them, and ask yourself if you think they’d really like it. Okay?

“Okay.”

Incident 2:

“Well, there was this other thing that happened…”

Yeah? What was that?

“Well, I kinda went ‘Arrghhh’ (gesticulating a lunge) at SingerBoy today because he was singing and I didn’t want him to.”

Ooooh… Wow, that’s pretty agressive! So this is back to having consideration for others, isn’t it?

“Yeah…”

So, what did SingerBoy do when you did that?

“Well, he kicked me in the… you know…”

(I’m sorry – I couldn’t help but laugh…) Gee, I hear that really hurts!

“Yeah…”

So you must have really made him mad. Maybe he thought you were picking a fight. And you know, maybe his Dad has taught him to fight back when someone picks on him…

(silence)

And you know he really loves to sing… Just like you love to do your stuff. You wouldn’t like it if someone lunged at you for leaving bits of sticker paper on the floor, would you?

“Well, no…”

Incident 3:

“This little kid asked me what I was playing on my DS today, and I said, ‘Well, you don’t really need to know; it’s rated Teen’. And then he said, ‘Oh, Ghost Recon. That’s nothing. I play Halo.”

Such confusion. To the literal mind, never in the world would a 10-year-old be playing Halo, of all things! So I focused on the tone of voice.

You know, it sounds like you might have been talking a bit like a Know-It-All… People kinda don’t like Know-It-Alls…

(silence)

Do you know what a Know-It-All is?

“Well, I guess not… Someone who knows everything?”

Explanations ensued. How we make friends. How we think about other people’s feelings. How we try to get along with others (amazingly, he was actually listening).

How, in a school, where EVERYONE has something that drives them nuts (since it’s a school especially for kids with ADHD, Autism, Asperger’s, etc.), it’s especially important to understand that we never know what’s going to push someone’s buttons…

(silence)

Do you know what “Push Someone’s Buttons” means?

“Well, no…”

More explanations.

The things we take for granted, assuming others automatically understand…

All in that 30-minute ride home. It was enough of a dose of parenting to last us both all night. I tend to focus so much on trying to help him understand “appropriate” (read: expected) behavior, hoping he’ll get less-blind-sided by life that way.

Yes, he thought about it, so much so that by the next morning, he was worried that he might be a “bad person”.

Geez, is there any part of parenting that’s not guess-work?

I wonder if priests feel this way when they hear confessions. At least with my son and our long commute, we can spend the aftermath doing damage control.

It’s far more fun spending half an hour telling my kid how awesome he is, and how the other kids might have gotten ‘talks’ too (since in many cases their actions deserve a little discussion, as well), and watching the smile and raised eyebrows of relief spread across his face… than it is to lecture on how we should behave in order to keep out of trouble.

Thank goodness both sink in.

And like magic, the next day is a good day.


“Asperger’s”

Diagnose & inhibit people with voices speaking the truth so others might hear.

(what does this mean to you?)

Make yourself known.

(unknown artist deserves credit.)

Make a new image of yourself.

(keep going.)

(Squiggly red line on the screen. . . Word. Word doesn’t understand or define “Asperger’s”. . . )

(this post is part one of a script for an upcoming video on autism, asperger’s syndrome and adhd. the preliminary version of the video may be viewed here.)


Diagnose & medicate people who tune into the Realm of All Knowing and decipher the code of the Universe.

People with ADHD know instinctively that everything interconnects.

Some people function effectively while engaging both sides of the brain. Some people perceive most clearly when they appear to “tune out”.

Some people learn affection by perceiving others’ emotions inside themselves.

Disrupting these natural tendencies may disrupt the individual’s peace.

Let your heartbeats echo the Universe

Love

Directs

Itself

START A FIRE.

Let yourself learn intuitively.

MISUNDERSTOOD wisdom

DESERVES acknowledgement.

Let yourself be led.

Everything flows

Everything congeals

Everything reveals

Everything subsides

Everything resides

Everything abides

People with ADHD know instinctively that everything interconnects.


“Autism”

Diagnoses & prevents people who prefer higher guidance to the rote of the world.

Who waits when the Divine calls?

Thank your open mind for hearing and seeing this message.

There will be no more mis-diagnoses

(manipulation…?)

when you accept all things engaging in possibility.

fear… genocide… war…

all disappear…

If you ignore possibility, chaos ensues.

The old paradigm describes that the meaty stuff lies in the realm into which all things fall.

We all receive lessons and information constantly from a realm in which all things arise.

Your higher guidance brings you there.

Slip into your inner world

Speak when you need to share, tune out the meaningless noise.

It’s your intuition calling.

Fiddle with that toy on your desk. Let your fingers tap and your knees bounce up and down.

Let your fingers tap.

Let your mind wander.

Let yourself go.

What do we ignore so powerfully that our teachers must appear like this?

This world emerges from your thoughts.

Everyone appearing to you is your teacher.

(this post is part one of a script for an upcoming video on autism, asperger’s syndrome and adhd. the preliminary version of the video may be viewed here.)



Let’s begin at the end of questioning.

All people have a place of peace and learning.

A quiet peace is acceptable to others. Disruptive peace calls for diagnosis.

When someone receives a diagnosis of Autism, Asperger’s, or ADHD, the world changes for them and others.

Diagnoses may lead to labeling; labeling may lead to stereotyping; stereotyping may lead to dismissiveness.

Everyone in this world is unique. Everyone in the world deserves to be recognized as a unique individual.

Developing and receiving diagnoses changes the world. For adults, receiving a diagnosis can be like finding a missing puzzle piece.

It may also bring relief and understanding. It may project confusion and fear. It may arouse resistance to being “labeled”.

We don’t always notice when we perceive things differently from those around us.

How does one learn he’s colorblind?

Or deaf?

Don’t worry about diagnosis. Understand yourself.

Working with others requires compromise. Compromise implies mutual effort.

Into this changing world, many people will continue to emerge who are not “normal”. Some day there will be no “normal” that will develop from formulated expectations.

Someday, “normal” will mean different and unique.

That will be a beautiful day.

We work with others in ways we cannot always perceive immediately.

We interact with others in our own ways.

What a beautiful day.

(this post is part one of a script for an upcoming video on autism, asperger’s syndrome and adhd. the preliminary version of the video may be viewed here.)